Coronary Stent Outcomes in STEMI Patients Not Influenced by Prior Cardiac Surgery

by Kathy Jones on  October 28, 2012 at 5:50 PM Heart Disease News   - G J E 4
A new study presented at the 2012 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference reveals that the outcomes of using coronary stent in severe heart attack (STEMI) patients is not influenced by whether they had prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG).
 Coronary Stent Outcomes in STEMI Patients Not Influenced by Prior Cardiac Surgery
Coronary Stent Outcomes in STEMI Patients Not Influenced by Prior Cardiac Surgery

Recognizing that the majority of data indicating worse outcomes for STEMI patients with prior CABG came from an older era of heart attack treatment, researchers at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation and Minneapolis Heart Institute® (MHI) at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis sought to assess contemporary outcomes in its regional STEMI network from April 2003 to December 2011.

"Traditionally, it is believed that patients with prior CABG are at much higher risk, are less likely to receive reperfusion therapy and have worse outcomes; thus, these patients have been frequently excluded from clinical trials," explains Timothy D. Henry, MD, an interventional cardiologist at the MHI at Abbott Northwestern and director of research with the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation. "As a result, there is limited contemporary data on these challenging patients, and they often didn't receive the current standard of care for STEMI, which is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)."

Of the 3,552 consecutive STEMI patients in the study, 7.1 percent had prior CABG. These patients were older, more frequently male and had increased prevalence of diabetes. The prior-CABG group also had lower baseline ejection fraction, lower current smoking rates and were less likely to have a lesion identified as the clear culprit of the heart attack.

"In addition, these patients frequently have abnormal baseline EKGs and challenging coronary anatomy," Dr. Henry said. "While patients with prior-CABG in this study did have a slightly lower rate of reperfusion, our reperfusion rate was still much higher compared with previous studies."

Patients in both groups had similar door-to-balloon times and both in-hospital stays (4.8 vs. 5 percent) and 30-day stays (4.8 vs. 5.7 percent) were similar. At one year, patients with prior CABG had numerically higher mortality (10.8 vs. 9 percent) which was not statistically significant.

Prior studies have suggested increased mortality in patients with prior CABG, but that "may have reflected the lower rates of reperfusion and older PCI strategies," according to the study authors.

"The outcomes of both arms are excellent and very similar, which is promising," Dr. Henry states. "The one group in whom the outcomes were slightly worse—but not statistically worse—were those prior-CABG patients in whom the saphenous vein graft was the culprit lesion for the heart attack."

Based on their findings, the researchers concluded that STEMI outcomes in patients with prior CABG, regardless of the culprit lesion, may be as good as STEMI patients overall when treated with a uniform protocol with the same rapid treatment.

"These results are another example of the benefits of a regional STEMI network, and its ability to provide more unified care," Henry states.

Source: Eurekalert

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