Medindia

X

Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Brings Marginal Life Expectancy Benefit

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on  July 17, 2014 at 6:14 PM Cancer News   - G J E 4
A new study has found that contralateral prophylactic mastectomy for women with breast cancer in one breast has increased, but it may confer only a marginal life expectancy benefit.
 Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Brings Marginal Life Expectancy Benefit
Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Brings Marginal Life Expectancy Benefit
Advertisement

To assess the survival benefit of CPM, Pamela R. Portschy, of the Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and colleagues, developed a model simulating survival outcomes of CPM or no CPM for women with newly diagnosed stage I or II breast cancer, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry and large meta-analyses. Survival benefit projections were made for women by age (40, 50, or 60 years), breast cancer stage (I or II), and estrogen receptor (ER) status (positive or negative). Women with BRCA mutations were excluded from the analysis because they have a much higher risk of developing contralateral breast cancer.

Advertisement
The average gain in life expectancy from CPM ranged from 0.13 to 0.59 years for women with stage I BC and from 0.08 to 0.29 years for those with stage II BC. The procedure was more beneficial for younger women and for those with stage I and ER-negative BC. The 20-year disease-free survival benefit ranged from 4.25% to 7.20% for women with stage I BC and from 2.73% to 4.62% for women with stage II BC, depending on age and ER status. However, the 20-year overall survival difference between CPM and no CPM did not exceed 1% for any group.

The authors did not evaluate other outcomes such as surgical complications and quality of life because "...utility values are highly variable between women." They write, "Survival is only one potential benefit of a cancer risk-reduction strategy; effects on cancer-related anxiety, cosmesis, and self-image are also important in decision-making processes." The authors conclude that "Survival estimates derived from our model may be useful for physicians and breast cancer patients to arrive at evidence-based informed decisions regarding CPM."

In an accompanying editorial, Stephen G. Pauker and Mohamed Alseiari of the Division of Clinical Decision Making, Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, write that although the benefit may be small on average, the choice of prophylactic contralateral mastectomy may not be unreasonable for some women, depending on their family history or genetic background. They write, "The balance between harm and benefit depends on the patient's preferences and highlights the importance of capturing the patient's values and expectations before considering CPM.
Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All