Common Protein Involved in Hair Growth and Weight Loss

by Kathy Jones on  April 3, 2014 at 8:49 PM Weight Loss
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In an exciting development, researchers have found how hair growth activated fat tissue growth in the skin below the hair follicle could lead to the development of a cream to dissolve fat.
 Common Protein Involved in Hair Growth and Weight Loss
Common Protein Involved in Hair Growth and Weight Loss

The research was led by Professor Fiona Watt at King's College London in collaboration with Professor of Dermatology Rodney Sinclair from the University of Melbourne and Epworth Hospital.

"The specific chemicals identified in this study could be produced synthetically and used in creams for topical application to the skin to modulate growth of fat beneath the skin," Professor Sinclair said in a press release. "A cream could trim fat specifically where it was applied by 'pausing' the production of factors that contribute to fat cell growth."

This also happens to be the first research to demonstrate that the skin below the hair follicle can regulate the development of fat.

The study details appear in the latest issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Source: Medindia

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