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Brain Size Does Not Influence Higher Intelligence: University Of Vienna

by Shirley Johanna on  October 15, 2015 at 6:07 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Men may have larger brains than women but that does not make them more intelligent says a new study that contradicts the belief that a bigger brain means an increased IQ potential.
Brain Size Does Not Influence Higher Intelligence: University Of Vienna
Brain Size Does Not Influence Higher Intelligence: University Of Vienna
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"Brain volume plays only a minor role in explaining IQ test performance in humans," said one of the researchers Jakob Pietschnig from the Institute of Applied Psychology of University of Vienna in Austria.

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The findings are based on data from over 8,000 participants.

"Rather, brain structure and integrity appear to be more important as a biological foundation of IQ, whilst brain size works as one of many compensatory mechanisms of cognitive functions," Pietschnig noted.

For instance, differences in brain size between men and women are well-established, yielding larger brains of men compared to women.

However, there are no differences in global IQ test performance between men and women, the researchers pointed out.

They noted that the importance of brain structure compared to brain volume becomes already evident when comparing different species.

When considering absolute brain size, the sperm whale weighs in with the largest central nervous system.

Similar results emerge when considering other aspects of species anatomy: Homo sapiens never appears at the top at the list, as would be expected.

Rather, differences in brain structure appear to be mainly responsible for between-species differences in cognitive performance, the study said.

Another example are individuals with megalencephaly syndrome (enlarged brain volume) who typically show lower IQ test performance than the average population.

"Therefore, structural aspects appear to be more important for cognitive performance within humans as well," Pietschnig noted.

The findings appeared in the journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.

Source: IANS
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