Medindia

X

Antibodies Identified in Mice Could be a Significant Step Toward Zika Vaccine

by Shirley Johanna on  July 28, 2016 at 6:50 PM Tropical Disease News   - G J E 4
Antibodies in lab mice that may be able to prevent Zika virus infection has been identified by a team of US researchers. This may be a significant step toward a vaccine.
Antibodies Identified in Mice Could be a Significant Step Toward Zika Vaccine
Antibodies Identified in Mice Could be a Significant Step Toward Zika Vaccine
Advertisement

The team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis published their findings in the journal Cell.

‘Currently, there is no vaccine on the market to prevent Zika virus. The identified antibodies will have to be adapted, and vaccine trials will be done on primates before tested in people. ’
Advertisement
The research shows how these six antibodies interact with the virus, and that they are specific enough to Zika virus -- and not other viruses -- that they could be used in diagnostic tests, the researchers said.

"Importantly, some of our antibodies can neutralize African, Asian and American strains of Zika virus to about the same degree," said co-senior author Daved Fremont, professor of pathology and immunology.

However, further research on vaccinating mice is not likely to be helpful, since mice obtain their mothers' antibodies mostly after birth.

In pregnant women, the mother's protective antibodies cross directly from the placenta to the fetus.

Finding a way to vaccinate pregnant women is key because Zika can cause birth defects.

Unlike most people, pregnant women cannot receive vaccines made from live, weakened viruses because pregnancy suppresses a woman's immune system and the small amount of virus could make the expectant mother ill.

The antibodies will have to be adapted and vaccine trials will likely need to be done in primates before they can be tested in people.

There is no vaccine on the market to prevent Zika, a virus that first emerged in 1947 in Uganda but in recent years has exploded across Central and South America and the Caribbean region.

Experts say the race to craft a vaccine is likely to take years.

Source: AFP
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All