Agricultural Society Linked To Development Of Woodworking Tools

by Rukmani Krishna on  August 13, 2012 at 11:36 PM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
A direct link between the development of an agricultural society and the development of woodworking tools during the Neolithic Age was suggested by a Tel Aviv University research.
 Agricultural Society Linked To Development Of Woodworking Tools
Agricultural Society Linked To Development Of Woodworking Tools

During the Neolithic Age (approximately 10000-6000 BCE), early man evolved from hunter-gatherer to farmer and agriculturalist, living in larger, permanent settlements with a variety of domesticated animals and plant life. This transition brought about significant changes in terms of the economy, architecture, man's relationship to the environment, and more.

Now Dr. Ran Barkai of Tel Aviv University's Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations has shed new light on this milestone in human evolution, demonstrating a direct connection between the development of an agricultural society and the development of woodworking tools.

"Intensive woodworking and tree-felling was a phenomenon that only appeared with the onset of the major changes in human life, including the transition to agriculture and permanent villages," said Dr. Barkai.

Prior to the Neolithic period, there is no evidence of tools that were powerful enough to cut and carve wood, let alone fell trees. But new archaeological evidence suggests that as the Neolithic age progressed, sophisticated carpentry developed alongside agriculture.

The use of functional tools in relation to woodworking over the course of the Neolithic period has not been studied in detail until now.

Through their work at the archaeological site of Motza, a neighbourhood in the Judean Hills, Dr. Barkai and his fellow researchers, Prof. Rick Yerkes of Ohio State University and Dr. Hamudi Khalaily of the Israel Antiquity Authority, have unearthed evidence that increasing sophistication in terms of carpentry tools corresponds with increased agriculture and permanent settlements.

The early part of the Neolithic age is divided into two distinct eras - Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) and Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Agriculture and domesticated plants and animals appear only in PPNB, so the transition between these two periods is a watershed moment in human history. And these changes can be tracked in the woodworking tools which belong to each period, noted Dr. Barkai.

Within PPNA, humans remained gatherers but lived in more permanent settlements for the first time, he said. Axes associated with this period are small and delicate, used for light carpentry but not suited for felling trees or other massive woodworking tasks.

In PPNB, the tools have evolved to much larger and heavier axes, formed by a technique called polishing. The researchers' in-depth analysis of these tools shows that they were used to cut down trees and complete various building projects.

"We can document step by step the transition from the absence of woodworking tools, to delicate woodworking tools, to heavier woodworking tools," Dr. Barkai said, and this follows the "actual transition from the hunter-gatherer lifestyle to agriculture."

He also identifies a trial-and-error phase during which humans tried to create an axe strong enough to undertake larger woodworking tasks. Eventually, they succeeded in creating a massive ground stone axe in PPNB.

Whether the transition to an agricultural society led to the development of major carpentry tools or vice versa remains to be determined, stated Dr. Barkai, who characterizes it as a "circular argument."

The research was published in the journal PLoS One.

Source: ANI

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All