Young Drivers More Prone to Car Crashes Due to Their 'Underdeveloped' Brains

by Tanya Thomas on  April 29, 2010 at 11:16 AM General Health News
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A new study has blamed the 'underdeveloped' brains of young drivers for increasing their propensity to be involved in car crashes.
 Young Drivers More Prone to Car Crashes Due to Their 'Underdeveloped' Brains
Young Drivers More Prone to Car Crashes Due to Their 'Underdeveloped' Brains

According to Dr Lisa Wundersitz, from the Centre for Automotive Research, the underdeveloped brains make young drivers more impulsive and less able to properly assess risks.

Wundersitz said research has shown that inexperience, distractions from modern technology and a cultural tendency to "take risks" were the reason for most accidents, reports The Couriermail.

"There is a biological element the prefrontal cortex of the brain is not fully developed until they are in their 20s," she said.

"This means their long-term planning skills, reasoning and impulse skills are all lacking.

"Typically, a lot of people might speed because they love the adrenaline rush it's sensation seeking.

"I guess you want to experience certain impulses and as we get older, you might have the same impulse but you will think of the consequences as well."

Wundersitz also blamed modern technology for the increase in young driver crashes.

"You have mobile phones, GPS, iPods, entertainment screens it can be quite distracting.

"An inexperienced driver suddenly has to divide their attention between driving and these distractions.

"It's more difficult for them than a more experienced driver, where the driving process is more automated," she said.

Source: ANI
TAN

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