Well-Cooked Meat Increases Cancer Risk

by Rajshri on  April 22, 2010 at 11:12 PM Cancer News
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 Well-Cooked Meat Increases Cancer Risk
While well cooked meat is tasty to eat, regularly consuming such meat can increase the risk of bladder cancer, a new research presented during the US cancer research conference reveals.

Researchers from the University of Texas observed more than 1,700 people and found that the risk of bladder cancer more than doubled among people who ate well cooked meat items such as steaks, pork chops and bacon.

The researchers said that cooked meat contains three types of cancer causing chemicals, known as heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which are also present in chicken and fish when they are fried. Such chemicals are formed when creatine, which is a chemical found in muscles, and amino acids combine at high cooking temperatures.

"This research reinforces the relationship between diet and cancer. These results strongly support what we suspected - people who eat a lot of red meat, particularly well-done red meat, such as fried or barbecued, seem to have a higher likelihood of bladder cancer", lead researcher Professor Xifeng Wu said.

Source: Medindia
RAS

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