Vitamin E may Boost TB Risk in Male Smokers With High Vitamin C Intake

by VR Sreeraman on  February 23, 2008 at 12:43 PM Menīs Health News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

Vitamin E may Boost TB Risk in Male Smokers With High Vitamin C Intake
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, has revealed that Vitamin E might increase tuberculosis risk in male smokers with high vitamin C intake.

In the study, Harri Hemila and Jaakko Kaprio, of the University of Helsinki, Finland found that six-year vitamin E supplementation increased tuberculosis risk by 72 percent in male smokers who had high dietary vitamin C intake, but vitamin E had no effect on those who had low dietary vitamin C intake.

Previous studies had suggested that vitamin E might improve the immune system and in animal studies it seemed to protect against various infections.

Keeping the previous studies in mind, the researchers carried out a study to determine whether vitamin E supplementation might decrease the risk of tuberculosis.

They analysed the data of the randomised trial, which was conducted in Finland between 1985-1993, and included male smokers aged 50-69 years.

There were 174 cases of tuberculosis in 29,023 participants during the 6-year supplementation of 50mg/day vitamin E.

The effect of vitamin E on tuberculosis risk was modified by the intake of vitamin C in diet.

The findings showed that Vitamin E had no effect on participants who had dietary vitamin C intake less than 90 mg/day.

However, it was also found that vitamin E supplementation increased tuberculosis risk by 72 percent in those who had dietary vitamin C intake over 90 mg/day.

The most dramatic increase in tuberculosis risk by vitamin E was restricted to a one-year period after the initiation of supplementation.

Issued by the prestigious Institute of Medicine, the US nutritional recommendations consider that vitamin E is safe in amounts up to 1000 mg/day.

However, this new study suggests that in some population groups vitamin E supplementation might be harmful at a substantially lower dose, 50 mg/day.

The researchers concluded 'the consumption of vitamin E supplements by the general population should be discouraged because there is evidence of harm for some people.'

The study is published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Source: ANI
LIN/M

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Related Links

More News on:

Calcium and Vitamin Supplements Tuberculosis AIDS/HIV Vitamin Supplements Vitamin C / Ascorbic acid Vitamin B6 Vitamin B9 Vitamin B-12 Vitamin-F Anti-ageing and Benefits of Red Wine 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive