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Viruses That can Become Effective Antibiotics Identified

by VR Sreeraman on  September 3, 2007 at 4:50 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Viruses That can Become Effective Antibiotics Identified
According to a new study, viruses found in the River Cam in Cambridge can become effective antibiotics. Researchers believe that phage can easily attack the exact strain of bacterial infection.
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"By using a virus that only attacks bacteria, called a phage - and some phages only attack specific types of bacteria - we can treat infections by targeting the exact strain of bacteria causing the disease", says Ana Toribio from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK.

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"This is much more targeted than conventional antibiotic therapy," Toribio added.

The scientists used a close relative of Escherichia coli, the bacterium that commonly causes food poisoning and gastrointestinal infections in humans, called Citrobacter rodentium, which has exactly the same gastrointestinal effects in mice. They were able to treat the infected mice with a cocktail of phages obtained from the River Cam that target C. rodentium. At present they are optimizing the selection of the viruses by DNA analysis to utilise phage with different profiles.

"Using phages rather than traditional broad-spectrum antibiotics, which essentially try to kill all bacteria they come across, is much better because they do not upset the normal microbial balance in the body", said Dr Derek Pickard from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

"We all need good bacteria to help us fight off infections, to digest our food and provide us with essential nutrients, and conventional antibiotics can kill these too, while they are fighting the disease-causing bacteria," Pickard added.

Phage based treatment has been largely ignored until recently in Western Europe and the USA. The main human clinical reports have come from Eastern Europe, particularly the Tbilisi Bacteriophage Institute in Georgia where bacteriophages are used for successful treatment of infections such as diabetic ulcers and wounds.

More studies are planned along western clinical trial lines with all the standards required. "The more we can develop the treatment and understand the obstacles encountered in using this method to treat gut infections, the more likely we are to maximise its chance of success in the long term", said Toribio.

"We have found that using a variety of phages to treat one disease has many benefits over just using one phage type to attack a dangerous strain of bacteria, overcoming any potential resistance to the phage from bacterial mutation," Toribio added.

"This brings us back to the problem we are trying to address in the first place. If anything, conventional antibiotic treatment has led to MRSA and other superbug infections becoming not only more prevalent but also more infectious and dangerous. Bacteriophage therapy offers an alternative that needs to be taken seriously in Western Europe", said Derek Pickard.

Source: ANI
LIN/J
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A discussion of phage therapy is currently very timely, not only because too many patients are dying of superbug infections; but also because of the recent release of the Canadian film: Killer Cure: The Amazing Adventures of Bacteriophage and the June 2006 release of the book by Thomas Haeusler entitled, Viruses vs. Superbugs, a solution to the antibiotics crisis? ( see http://www.bacteriophagetherapy.info ) Further, the phage therapy file has dramatically changed because the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has amended the US food additive regulations to provide for the safe use of a bacteriophage preparation on ready-to-eat meat and poultry products as an antimicrobial agent against Listeria monocytogenes (see http://www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/98fr/02f-0316-nfr0001.pdf ). An enlightening FDA questions-and-answers document can be found at http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/opabacqa.html.
guest Wednesday, October 3, 2007

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