Turning Veggie may End Up Doing More Harm to the Environment Than Eating Meat

by Savitha C Muppala on  February 12, 2010 at 10:38 PM Diet & Nutrition News   - G J E 4
 Turning Veggie may End Up Doing More Harm to the Environment Than Eating Meat
A new study has determined that becoming a vegetarian can do more harm to the environment than continuing to eat red meat.

According to The Times, the study by Cranfield University, commissioned by the environmental group WWF, found that many meat substitutes were produced from soy, chickpeas and lentils that were grown overseas and imported into Britain.

It found that switching from beef and lamb reared in Britain to meat substitutes would result in more foreign land being cultivated and raise the risk of forests being destroyed to create farmland.

Meat substitutes also tended to be highly processed and involved energy-intensive production methods.

Lord Stern of Brentford, one of the world's leading climate change economists, caused uproar among Britain's livestock farmers last October when he claimed that a vegetarian diet was better for the planet.

He told The Times, "Meat is a wasteful use of water and creates a lot of greenhouse gases. It puts enormous pressure on the world's resources. A vegetarian diet is better."

However, the Cranfield study found that the environmental benefits of vegetarianism depended heavily on the type of food consumed as an alternative to meat.

"A switch from beef and milk to highly refined livestock product analogues such as tofu could actually increase the quantity of arable land needed to supply the UK," it said.

A significant increase in vegetarianism in Britain could cause the collapse of the country's livestock industry and result in production of meat shifting overseas to countries with few regulations to protect forests and other uncultivated land, it added.

ccording to Donal Murphy-Bokern, one of the study authors, "For some people, tofu and other meat substitutes symbolise environmental friendliness but they are not necessarily the badge of merit people claim. Simply eating more bread, pasta and potatoes instead of meat is more environmentally friendly."

"The figures used in the report are based on a number of questionable assumptions about how vegetarians balance their diet and how the food industry might respond to increased demand," said Liz O'Neill, spokeswoman for the Vegetarian Society.

"If you're aiming to reduce your environmental impact by going vegetarian, then it's obviously not a good idea to rely on highly processed products, but that doesn't undermine the fact that the livestock industry causes enormous damage and that moving towards a plant-based diet is good for animals, human health and the environment," she added. (ANI)

Source: ANI

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