The Huge Spread of HIV may Have Been Caused by the Decision to Stop Administering Smallpox Vaccination

by Savitha C Muppala on  May 19, 2010 at 11:45 AM AIDS/HIV News
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Researchers feel that, one big reason for the mammoth spread of HIV was the decision to stop giving the small pox vaccination during the mid-20th century.
 The Huge Spread of HIV may Have Been Caused by the Decision to Stop Administering Smallpox Vaccination
The Huge Spread of HIV may Have Been Caused by the Decision to Stop Administering Smallpox Vaccination
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It is known that vaccinia immunization, as given to prevent the spread of smallpox, produces a five-fold reduction in HIV replication in the laboratory.

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Raymond Weinstein, a family doctor turned laboratory scientist at George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, USA, in collaboration with a team from George Washington University and UCLA to look at the ability of white blood cells taken from people recently immunised with vaccinia to support HIV replication compared to unvaccinated controls.

They found significantly lower viral replication in blood cells from vaccinated individuals.

"There have been several proposed explanations for the rapid spread of HIV in Africa, including wars, the reuse of unsterilized needles and the contamination of early batches of polio vaccine. However, all of these have been either disproved or do not sufficiently explain the behavior of the HIV pandemic. Our finding that prior immunization with vaccinia virus may provide an individual with some degree of protection to subsequent HIV infection suggests that the withdrawal of such vaccination may be a partial explanation," said Weinstein.

Smallpox immunization was gradually withdrawn from the 1950s to the 1970s following the worldwide eradication of the disease, and HIV has been spreading exponentially since approximately the same time period.

The researchers have proposed that vaccination may confer protection against HIV by producing long term alterations in the immune system, possibly including the expression of a certain receptor, CCR5, on the surface of a person's white blood cells which is exploited by both viruses.

Speaking about the results, Weinstein said: "While these results are very interesting and hopefully may lead to a new weapon against the HIV pandemic, they are very preliminary and it is far too soon to recommend the general use of vaccinia immunization for fighting HIV".

The study has been published in the open access journal BMC Immunology.

Source: ANI
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