Study Says Asking Adolescents What They Wish For, Could be Eye Opening

by Kathy Jones on  May 3, 2011 at 7:07 PM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
While trying to figure out what's going on in an adolescent's mind can be challenging, simply asking them what they wish for could prove to be eye-opening, says a new study.
 Study Says Asking Adolescents What They Wish For, Could be Eye Opening
Study Says Asking Adolescents What They Wish For, Could be Eye Opening

The question: "If you could have three wishes, what would they be?" is included on a questionnaire designed to be filled by adolescent patients before a doctor's visit.

The survey, which is part of the American Medical Association's Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services program, also includes questions about medical history, health, school, safety and substance use.

The authors of the study analysed the themes of responses from 110 adolescent patients ages 11-18 years to the three wishes question.

They also looked at how the themes were related to respondents' age, sex, income and racial/ethnic background.

Results showed that 85 percent of adolescents had wishes for themselves, 32 percent had wishes for others, and 10 percent had a wish for both themselves and others.

Boys were more likely than girls to wish for things only for themselves (73 percent vs. 46 percent), while girls were more likely than boys to wish for something for their families (26 percent vs. 9 percent).

"While most of the wishes are predictable, the occasionally poignant wish like, 'I wish my mama felt better' reminds us of the value of asking these questions," Eliana M. Perrin, MD, MPH, FAAP, senior author of the study, said.

The most common themes were to be wealthy (41 percent of wishes), followed by material items, e.g., a video game system or a car (31 percent).

Twenty percent of adolescents had wishes for the world (i.e., world peace), and about 17 percent had wishes for their family or school or athletic success (e.g., to be an NBA player).

Boys also wished more for success, while girls wished more for happiness.

"Despite what we thought going into the study, only about 8 percent of adolescent wishes were about personal appearance, with only 4 percent wishing to be thinner," Dr. Perrin, associate professor of paediatrics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and paediatrician at North Carolina Children's Hospital, said.

There were no differences in types of wishes by age or race/ethnicity, though teens with private insurance were more likely than those with public insurance to have wishes for the world.

"We so rarely get an insight into teenagers' wishes, and this study and the screening form in general give adolescents a voice. Examining trends over time may help shape policy and education for adolescents," Perrin said.

Lead author Josh P. Boyd, a medical student at American University of Antigua Medical School, St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda, said the study provided clinical value.

"In my experience with this study, I've found that providing adolescents a chance to describe themselves and their future objectives has significant clinical value, particularly with the number of health issues they currently face," he stated.

Source: ANI

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