Soon, Cell Phones Could Help Lose Weight

by Sheela Philomena on  January 11, 2012 at 1:41 PM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
Soon, cell phones may help you shed those extra kilos.
 Soon, Cell Phones Could Help Lose Weight
Soon, Cell Phones Could Help Lose Weight

Researchers with Calit2's Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems (CWPHS) and the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, at University of California, San Diego are expanding a previous study aimed at finding out if cell phone technology can help with weight loss.

For one year, researchers with the "ConTxt" study will evaluate the use of cell phone text messages to remind participants to make wise nutritional choices throughout the day.

Participants randomized to the intervention conditions will also be given tailored messages for weight loss and lifestyle changes as well as a pedometer to monitor their daily activity.

"ConTxt is an innovative, yet straightforward approach to getting people to monitor their diet and physical activity," said CWPHS project principal investigator Kevin Patrick, MD, MS, professor of Family and Preventive Medicine, UC San Diego School of Medicine.

"We are trying to make this as pain free as possible. People won't stick to something that's too difficult and they're all multi-tasking anyway. We're doing this study to increase what we know about using the cell phone to get messages to busy people on the go."

ConTxt is recruiting more than 300 participants for the study.

As a part of tailoring of the program, surveys completed during baseline visit will help assess the participant's lifestyle, for example, assessing nearby grocery stores, finding opportunities for physical activity and possibly enlisting the support of friends or family.

The intervention is designed to send "prompts," text or picture messages, with specific suggestions or tips regarding diet and improving lifestyle habits.

"It seems like everybody has a cell phone. Those who do usually carry it with them at all times," explained ConTxt study coordinator Lindsay W. Dillon, MPH, CHES.

"We want to see if we can use that same technology to get people to think differently," Dillon added.

Source: ANI

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