Sleep Apnea and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Doubles the Risk of Death

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  April 2, 2011 at 9:25 PM Senior Health News
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A new research by scientists of the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia has stated that older adults suffering from moderate to severe sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness have more than twice the risk of death as compared to people who do not have both conditions.
 Sleep Apnea and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Doubles the Risk of Death
Sleep Apnea and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Doubles the Risk of Death

289 adults over 65-years of age were part of the study. About 20% older adults have sleep apnea and 10-33% adults are affected by excessive daytime sleepiness. However, having sleep apnea alone or just feeling excessively sleepy during the day did not increase the risk of death.

Researchers have not been able to understand the reason why sleep apnea combined with excessive daytime sleepiness might increase the risk of death among older adults. Further studies have to be carried out to find out whether treatment would reduce the risk of death for these people. This study is published in the journal 'Sleep'.


Source: Medindia

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