'Singing Brains' Offer Hope For Better Epilepsy, Schizophrenia Treatments

by VR Sreeraman on  May 22, 2009 at 12:11 PM Research News   - G J E 4
 'Singing Brains' Offer Hope For Better Epilepsy, Schizophrenia Treatments
A team of scientists at Cardiff University, led by an Indian origin boffin, has discovered that studying the way a person's brain 'sings' could shed light on conditions such as epilepsy and schizophrenia and help develop better treatments.

Professor Krish Singh of Cardiff University's School of Psychology, who led the research, and his colleagues found that a person's brain produces a unique electrical oscillation at a particular frequency when a person looks at a visual pattern.

They also found that the frequency of this oscillation appears to be determined by the concentration of a neurotransmitter chemical, GABA, in the visual cortex of each person's brain.

The more GABA was present, the higher the frequency or "note" of the oscillation. GABA is a key inhibitory neurotransmitter and is essential for the normal operation of the brain.

"Using sophisticated MEG and MRI brain imaging equipment, we've found that when a person looks at a visual pattern their brain produces an electrical signal, known as a gamma oscillation, at a set frequency," Sing said.

"In effect, each person's brain 'sings' at a different note in the range 40-70 Hz. This is similar to the notes in the lowest octaves of a standard piano keyboard or the lower notes on a bass guitar. Importantly, we also found that this frequency appears to be controlled by how much of an essential neurotransmitter, GABA, is present in a person's visual cortex," he added.

According to the researchers, these findings will have important implications for future clinical studies, especially in terms of increasing our understanding of conditions such as epilepsy and schizophrenia, where it is known that there may be a problem with GABA.

" We hope that the study of gamma oscillation frequency will provide a new window into the action of neurotransmitters such as GABA and how their function is compromised in diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia," Singh said.

"We also believe that our findings could have important implications for the development, production and effectiveness of drugs to treat these and other neurological conditions," Singh added.

The study has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA.

Source: ANI

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