Scientists Advise: Lower Cholesterol And You Will Lower Risk of Prostate Cancer

by Tanya Thomas on  February 26, 2009 at 7:09 AM Cancer News   - G J E 4
 Scientists Advise: Lower Cholesterol And You Will Lower Risk of Prostate Cancer
A new study has claimed that the growth of a possiblly malignant prostate tumor can be blocked by lowering cholesterol levels.

Prostate tumors accumulate high levels of cholesterol, and tumor incidence correlates with eating a high fat/high cholesterol "Western" diet. In addition, prostate tumor progression has been linked to serum cholesterol levels.

To reach the conclusion, Dr. Keith Solomon and colleagues fed mice a high fat/high cholesterol "Western" diet.

They found that high cholesterol levels promoted tumor growth and that Ezetimibe (Zetia), which blocks the absorption of cholesterol from the intestine, could prevent this increased tumor growth.

Ezetimibe also blocked a cholesterol-mediated increase in angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels required for tumor progression.

These data suggest that reducing cholesterol levels may inhibit prostate cancer growth specifically by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis.

The article from Solomon et al suggests "that cholesterol reduction, which is routinely accomplished pharmacologically in humans, may reduce angiogenesis, ultimately leading to less aggressive tumors."

"Lowering cholesterol levels whether through diet, exercise, or the use of safe cholesterol-lowering drugs is known to provide a substantial benefit to patients-in the future it may be possible to add reduced risk of serious prostate cancer to that list of benefits" says Solomon.

"We are in the process of working with clinicians to translate these findings into potential human studies. If we can demonstrate the effects noted in our pre-clinical studies in human patients we may be save lives and improve the quality of life," adds Dr. Michael Freeman, senior author of the study.

The related report by Solomon et al, "Ezetimibe Is an Inhibitor of Tumor Angiogenesis," appears in the March 2009 issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

Source: ANI

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