Risk of Heart Disease Increased by Added Sugars

by Rajshri on  April 26, 2010 at 9:23 PM Heart Disease News
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 Risk of Heart Disease Increased by Added Sugars
A new study has indicated that consuming large amounts of added sugar increase the risk of heart disease.

The study looked at US government nutritional data and fat levels in over 6,000 adults. The study participants were divided into groups based on added sugar intake. The highest consuming group consumed an average of 46 teaspoons of sugar of added sugars, while just an average three teaspoons was consumed by the lowest group.

Dr. Miriam Vos and public health nurse Jean Welsh at Emory University, who collaborated in the study, said that it was evident that consuming large amounts of added sugars increased the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides and in turn increased heart risk."Just like eating a high fat diet can increase your levels of triglycerides and cholesterol, eating sugar can also affect those same lipids," she said.

The American Heart Association says that women must take just 100 calories from added sugars and men 150 calories per day.

The study is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association




Source: Medindia
RAS

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