Risk of Bladder Cancer Increases With Eating Sausages and Bacon

by Rathi Manohar on  August 3, 2010 at 6:23 PM Cancer News
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The risk of bladder cancer increases by 30 percent with eating sausages, bacon and other processed food that has additives, claims a new study.

Salts like sodium nitrite and nitrate in these foods can react with stomach acid to form cancerous products during digestion.
 Risk of Bladder Cancer Increases With Eating Sausages and Bacon
Risk of Bladder Cancer Increases With Eating Sausages and Bacon
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Scientists at the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, United States assessed the relationship between the intake of the meat additives and the risk of developing bladder cancer.

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According to the Telegraph, Dr Amanda Cross, who led the study, said that not enough data was available to draw conclusive findings, and called for further studies.

A few other studies have already proven a link between meat and cancer of the bladder and bowels.

The new research is to be published today in the online journal of the American Cancer Society.

Source: ANI
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