Researchers Verify New Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer

by Savitha C Muppala on  December 15, 2010 at 11:15 AM Cancer News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

Researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Centre have studied the various risk factors for brain metastases in breast cancer.
 Researchers Verify New Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer
Researchers Verify New Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer

"If we can identify those patients who are predisposed to brain metastases, we may be able to mirror the model used in small cell lung cancer where prophylactic cranial irradiation has decreased the frequency of brain metastases and improved patient survival," said Veeraiah Siripurapu.

In this study, Siripurapu and colleagues identified 49 patients with brain metastases who were included in a prospectively-collected database of breast cancer patients. They compared these patients with control patients who had similar tumor size, nodal status, and estrogen receptor status at diagnosis but lacked brain tumors.

The patients with brain metastases had a median overall survival of just 38.6 months compared with the group of control patients which had not reached a median overall survival with a mean follow-up of 100 months.

When the team compared the tumor characteristics of the two patient groups, they found that prior non-brain metastases, high nuclear tumor grade, progesterone receptor negativity, and inflammatory breast cancer were associated with an increased risk of brain metastases in a univariate analysis with high nuclear grade remaining significant in a multivariable analysis.

"The data are accumulating in the literature with regard to what tumor characteristics are associated with brain metastases, but there is no consensus on what should be included in a model to predict risk," Siripurapu said.

"Looking at our case-control analysis - which is a novel approach for this question - we also found that high tumor grade was certainly a marked factor in risk. Progesterone receptor negativity and a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer may also be valuable additions to a predictive model." Siripurapu added.

He cautions that it is too early to say how a predictive model might alter patient care.

"At a minimum, we might be able to use it to identify patients who should be followed more closely," he said.

"Ultimately, we might be able to use in a preventive treatment strategy, but that would require having a model that has higher sensitivity and specificity than we can achieve right now."

"The importance of piecing together a strong predictive model is that it would allow us to test the possibility in a randomized clinical trial."

Source: ANI

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

Women and Cancer Parkinsons Disease Pagets disease of the breast Mastitis Cancer and Homeopathy Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Breast Cancer Facts Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive