Reduce Intake of Red Meat to Reduce Cancer Risk

by Kathy Jones on  May 23, 2011 at 9:59 PM Cancer News
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A new report released by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has once again urged the general public to reduce their intake of red meat and warned that it is responsible for increasing the risk of cancer.
 Reduce Intake of Red Meat to Reduce Cancer Risk
Reduce Intake of Red Meat to Reduce Cancer Risk

The latest advisory comes four years after the WCRF first reported the study which showed a link between cancer and consumption of red meat. The cancer charity organization has called on the general public to cut down on the consumption of red meat items such as beef and pork while it said that people should completely stop eating processed meat such as ham and salami.

"WCRF recommends that people limit consumption to 500g (cooked weight) of red meat a week, roughly the equivalent of five or six medium portions of roast beef, lamb or pork, and avoid processed meat", the report said.

The report was part of the WCRF funded study that was conducted by researchers from the Imperial College of London who studied more than 260 research papers looking into the link between diet and bowel cancer.




Source: Medindia

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