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Poverty Increases Violence Risk for Girls Much More Than Boys

by Savitha C Muppala on  December 1, 2010 at 5:57 PM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
A new study has indicated that poverty increases the risk of violence for girls much more than boys.
 Poverty Increases Violence Risk for Girls Much More Than Boys
Poverty Increases Violence Risk for Girls Much More Than Boys
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According to the Cardiff University study of former industrial areas, the new results suggest violence prevention strategies need to focus more on local inequalities, especially to protect vulnerable adolescent girls.

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The team studied nearly 700 young people, aged 11 to 17, who attended casualty departments in South Wales with injuries from violence.

The team found that assault injury rates were uniformly higher in the most deprived areas.

Overall, boys were more at risk of violence than girls. However, the team also found that the risk of injury increased more rapidly for girls than boys as material deprivation increased.

In one deprived area, girls faced a risk of violence six times greater than in more affluent wards. Boys in the same area were twice as likely to be injured than in more affluent areas. This means that the risk to girls was three times more sensitive to deprivation.

"The study clearly shows that poverty raises the risk of violence dramatically more for girls than boys. There's no reason to believe this will not apply to all former industrial areas in the UK," said Jonathan Shepherd, Director of the Violence and Society Research Group.

"The facts linking deprived neighborhoods to violence are complex and include social cohesion, substance abuse and family stress. It is not clear why the risk to girls should be so much more sensitive to deprivation but the reason may be linked to the different ways girls of different backgrounds resolve disputes, he added.

Shepherd further noted that, "there is already concern about the violence risk to young women. Injury prevention schemes need to be directed at children and adolescents in areas of highest deprivation to improve their life chances and well-being."

He concluded informing that emergency department doctors responsible for treating the results of this violence have an important role to play in this, working with community safety partners and child protection agencies.

Source: ANI
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