Over 50% of Maori Patients are Non-Responsive to Common Heart Attack Medications

by Kathy Jones on  June 14, 2011 at 7:38 PM Drug News
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A study conducted by researchers from the Victoria University and Capital and Coast District Health Board has revealed that more than half of the heart patients from Maori and Pacific Island are not responsive to commonly used heart attack medications.
 Over 50% of Maori Patients are Non-Responsive to Common Heart Attack Medications
Over 50% of Maori Patients are Non-Responsive to Common Heart Attack Medications

According to the report, more than 57 percent patients from Maori and Pacific Island are not responding to the commonly used heart attack drug, clopidogrel, which is given to help improve the blood flow in patients.

This is far higher than the national average of 38 percent.

The report has led to concerns that the patients are not getting the best available treatment with Wellington Hospital cardiologist Dr Scott Harding stating that doctors should try switching to a more powerful drug, prasugrel, even though the drug is not state funded.

Source: Medindia

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