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Not an Easy Task for US Marines With Respect to Afghan Healthcare

by Savitha C Muppala on  March 25, 2010 at 10:19 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
It is no child'd play to restore healthcare in Afghanisthan. US Major James Coffman came out with a proposal to restore healthcare to a southern Afghan town following many years of Taliban rule.
 Not an Easy Task for US Marines With Respect to Afghan Healthcare
Not an Easy Task for US Marines With Respect to Afghan Healthcare
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"We need your advice on what and how to bring assistance, training, equipment," he told four Afghan doctors and pharmacists, who stroked their beards after braving bombs and Taliban threats to meet US Marine commanders.

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Too bad for Coffman that the Afghans were unconvinced.

"It's best for us at the moment if you don't help. At least not until security returns," said Doctor Azim softly. His colleagues agreed.

"Crossing Marjah to get here, I was stopped three times by the Taliban who asked me where I was going, if I was working for the Americans. It's too dangerous," he said.

The Marines looked like they had been punched.

Last month they led 15,000 troops into Marjah in a massive effort to wipe out Taliban insurgents and return control to the government in what was billed as the biggest military offensive since the 2001 fall of the Taliban.

With the main fighting phase over, Marines are under orders to move to the next level -- develop reconstruction and restore services to make it harder for the Taliban to come back, and bring a quick end to the war, in its ninth year.

Criticised by aid groups for not doing enough to protect civilians after the Marjah offensive began on February 13, soldiers want to help the local population.

Despite their best intentions, 3rd batallion, 6th regiment Marines Corp found it difficult to get healthcare workers onside in the rural settlement where homes are built of mud and poppy fields run to the horizon.

"You were brave enough to come this way. We know about the IED (improvised explosive device) threats and Taliban retaliation," said Coffman, trying to cajole the doctors on Forward Operating Base Sharwali, the US Marine base north of Marjah.

"Afghanistan will be rebuilt by strong men like you," he said.

US Marines recently conducted a 27-hour operation searching more than 60 farms around Marjah, looking for remnants of the Taliban and defusing bombs left behind by insurgents in the fields and on the roads.

In a small cemetery, the biggest grave contains the remains of a Taliban member killed by "American animals," according to an inscription.

Lieutenant Colonel Brian Christmas, the Marine commander for northern Marjah, listened to the doctors' concerns and promised to take action and continue night patrols.

"If it's a day where we don't find IEDs, that I don't have my guys under small arms fire, that people go to the bazaar and my guys come back safe, it's a good day," he told AFP.

"The Taliban are here. They haven't left. They look at us as well as we look at them."

To the doctors, he said: "Security is here. There will always be a threat, but the Taliban won't prevent you from helping your people."

Doctor Azim appeared to disagree. "The Taliban glue pamphlets on our doors banning us from opening our pharmacies," he said.

The four visitors were unanimous -- there can be no direct contact with American forces. It would be "too dangerous."

A suggestion that they nominate a trusted go-between to pass on messages was greeted by a polite silence.

But Christmas refused to take no for an answer.

"There are Taliban, but at some point good people from Marjah have to stand up and do something. We'll work to help you. It's time for you to stand up and say 'we want clinics'," he said.

Doctor Noor Ahmad, who studied at university in Kabul and whose long white beard and golden glasses lend him an air of wisdom, suggests the tribal leaders return. "They are the solution," he says.

Christmas closes the meeting, acknowledging that the longer they wait to ask the elders to return, the more difficult it will be to get them to come back.

To Azim he says: "I'll give you my number. Any time you have decided to do something, you tell me."

Azim's response is pragmatic: "If they know I've got your number, I'll end up with my head on a spike."

"Memorise my number then," fires back Christmas.

"They don't say 'no.' Only the fact they are here means they said 'yes.' We just have to find the way out," the commander sighed.

Source: AFP
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