No Foul Play, Woolmer Died of Naural Causes, Say Jamaican Police

by Medindia Content Team on  June 13, 2007 at 12:15 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
No Foul Play, Woolmer Died of Naural Causes, Say Jamaican Police
Woolmer, 58, died after being found unconscious in his Kingston hotel room on 18 March, after Pakistan lost to Ireland in the cricket World Cup. An initial pathologist's report had concluded that he had been strangled. Every member of the Pakistan team was fingerprinted before returning home, sparking anger among many in Pakistan.

Jamaican Police Commissioner Lucius Thomas on Monday told a news conference that three different expert opinions had concluded that the original pathologist report of death by manual asphyxiation was wrong.

He also said that toxicology tests had now been received and that they showed there was no substance to indicate poisoning. "The police have now closed the investigation into the death of Bob Woolmer," Thomas said. He launched a strong defence of the police investigation, saying it had been commended by both Scotland Yard and Pakistani police who had helped with the case.

Mr Woolmer's widow, Gill, said: "My sons and I are relieved to be officially informed that Bob died of natural causes and that no foul play is suspected in his death." Mr Woolmer's death sparked speculation he had been murdered by an angry fan or by an illegal betting syndicate. There was also speculation members of the Pakistan team may have been involved.

Mr Thomas said the Jamaica Constabulary Force had found no evidence "of any impropriety by players, match officials nor management". He said the force had carried out its investigation thoroughly and with respect to the Pakistan cricket team. But Pakistan's former captain Imran Khan said he was shocked there was no apology to the national side.

He said Pakistan's cricket board should sue those responsible for the "humiliation that the Pakistan team went through". "Bob Woolmer had diabetes, he had blood pressure, an enlarged heart, he had respiratory problems. On top of it, the depression of losing and then he drank a bottle of champagne. They should have first ruled out natural causes before this whole drama about the murder," Imran Khan said.

But Inzamam-ul-Haq, captain during the World Cup, said that although the days after Mr Woolmer's death were "the most terrible of our lives", legal action now would serve no purpose. The Monday news conference was seen by some as an attempt to shift the blame for the errors in the case onto the report of the original pathologist, Dr Ere Sheshiah.

Source: Medindia

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