New Method for Engineering Human Tissue Regeneration Discovered

by Kathy Jones on  May 15, 2011 at 9:17 PM Genetics & Stem Cells News   - G J E 4
A new method, which if clinically proven successful could represent a major scientific leap toward human tissue regeneration and engineering, Yale scientists have found.
 New Method for Engineering Human Tissue Regeneration Discovered
New Method for Engineering Human Tissue Regeneration Discovered

They have provided evidence to support a major paradigm shift in this specialty area from the idea that cells added to a graft before implantation are the building blocks of tissue, to a new belief that engineered tissue constructs can actually induce or augment the body's own reparative mechanisms, including complex tissue regeneration.

"We believe that through an understanding of human vascular biology, coupled with technologies such as tissue engineering, we can introduce biological grafts that mimic the functional properties of native vessels and that are capable of growing with the patients," said Christopher K. Breuer from Yale University School of Medicine.

Breuer also said that patients are currently being enrolled in a first-of-its-kind clinical trial at Yale University to evaluate the safety and growth potential of tissue-engineered vascular grafts in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

To make this discovery, Breuer and colleagues conducted a three-part study in mice, starting with two groups of mice.

The first group expressed a gene that made all of its cells fluorescent green and the second group was normal.

Researchers extracted bone marrow cells from the "green" mice, added them to previously designed scaffolds, and implanted the grafts into the normal mice.

The seeded bone marrow cells improved the performance of the graft; however, a rapid loss of green cells was noted and the cells that developed in the new vessel wall were not green, suggesting that the seeded cells promoted vessel development, but did not turn into vessel wall cells themselves.

These findings led to the second part of the study, which tested whether cells produced in the host's bone marrow might be a source for new cells.

Scientists replaced the bone marrow cells of a female mouse with those of a male mouse before implanting the graft into female mice.

The researchers found that the cells forming the new vessel were female, meaning they did not come from the male bone marrow cells.

In the final experiment, researchers implanted a segment of male vessel attached to the scaffold into a female host.

After analysis, the researchers found that the side of the graft next to the male segment developed with male vessel wall cells while the side of the graft attached to the female host's vessel formed from female cells, proving that the cells in the new vessel must have migrated from the adjacent normal vessel.

The discovery was published in the FASEB Journal.

Source: ANI

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