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Meltdown Affects Sex Life Too, Stress Proves too Much

by Gopalan on  April 1, 2009 at 10:40 AM Sexual Health News   - G J E 4
 Meltdown Affects Sex Life Too, Stress Proves too Much
Global meltdown affects sex life too, stress proves too much, say US experts.
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A retired New York psychiatrist, Lynne Maidman, says declining interest in sex in a financially troubled environment is a natural offshoot among couples who have become emotionally stressed over job or stock losses. "Today's kings of the universe want to be macho, have the ability to buy anything, go to great restaurants and order great wines," she says, "and when they're thwarted in this respect and become depressed, sex has to suffer and that's precisely what's happening."

Kara Nichols, a clinical psychologist in Chicago, whose practice focuses on singles and couples in the 25-45 age group, is also convinced that things are bad. "No two ways about it; the financial turmoil is taking its toll in the bedroom," says grees,

Incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders, symptoms synonymous with decreased sex drives is on the increase, she believes and traces it all to growing money worries. "It's a definite trend that's likely to reach growing proportions if the current economic stress is sustained," she says.

She also points out when the stress from financial difficulties rises, it could also result in greater friction, squabbles and worse - certainly not a conducive situation for sex.

In her cases, Nichols finds that both men women seem to be equally affected as most of the women contribute financially to the family. Women and men, though, do experience the stress differently, with men wanting to distance themselves and have more alone or down time (if they can't solve the financial issues outright), while women are more inclined to discuss the financial stress the couple is under. In any event, the difference in these coping styles in itself adds to the stress, Nichols points out, by leading to an increased rift in the relationship and consequently less sex.

Amy Levine, a New York City sex coach and sex educator, says the financial crisis is definitely impacting a percentage of Americans, resulting in no sex, infrequent sex or sex that only lasts a very short amount of time. Differentiating on how the crisis is specifically affecting men and women, she finds some men, notably those feeling insecure, having erectile problems, while women, due to decreased sexual desire, postponing sex.

"The extra stress from money problems is clearly leading to less love-making," one of Denver's leading sex therapists, Dr. Neil Cannon, says. "It's also affecting our business," he complains, observing that some people who have lost their jobs have stopped coming for therapy, while others have cut back the frequency of their therapy sessions to once a month from one a week. He also notes a number of clients who used to come during work hours have stopped doing so for fear of putting their job in jeopardy, writes Dan Dorfman in Huffington Post.

What is the way out then? Nobody is clear, except to advise couples to go for it, enjoy more of it, instead of frittering away their precious time in worrying or squabbling. After all sex is free, generally, why ruin it by messing it up with extraneous issues?

Source: Medindia
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