Male Circumcision can Cut HIV Infection, Studies Show

by VR Sreeraman on  July 19, 2007 at 8:00 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Scientific studies have confirmed a long-standing belief that male circumcision can reduce HIV infection rates in men by 60 percent, an international AIDS conference will be told next week.
Male Circumcision can Cut HIV Infection, Studies Show
Male Circumcision can Cut HIV Infection, Studies Show

David Cooper, the co-chairman of an International AIDS Society (IAS) conference to be held in Sydney from July 22-25, said research on male circumcision represented a major development in HIV prevention.

"We always knew that if you went into any particular African country that HIV rates among Muslim men were lots lower," Cooper told AFP.

"But we were never sure that the Muslim men had lower numbers of partners than non-Muslim men, so people always doubted it."

Cooper said the only way to ensure the link between lower HIV rates and circumcision was not due to cultural factors was to carry out random trials, the results of which will be presented at the Sydney conference.

He said three trials were conducted in South Africa, Kenya and Uganda, each involving more than 2,000 heterosexual men, half of whom were circumcised.

"The reduction in HIV infection was about 60 percent, so clearly it works," said Cooper, who is also the director of Australia's National Centre for HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research.

Cooper said the studies showed circumcision could be a powerful tool in helping curb HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa, where infection rates in some countries are up to 40 percent of the adult population.

He said, however, that any introduction of widespread male circumcision in developing countries needed to be carried out with an education campaign that reinforced a safe sex message.

"In some areas of sub-Saharan Africa men are requesting circumcision, which is a bit of a worry, as they may think they're protected and they're not," Cooper said.

"It merely reduces the risk, you still have to use condoms, men can't think 'that's all I need to do, I can now have unsafe sex'."

The clinical reason for circumcision's preventive effect is still being investigated.

One theory is that the foreskin has a very thin lining and suffers minor abrasions during intercourse, making it easier for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to enter the man's bloodstream. Another is that the foreskin is rich in Langerhans cells, whose surface is configured in such a way that the AIDS virus readily latches on to them.

Source: AFP

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This is not a new finding, the advantages of male circumcision were known 15 hundred years ago by the muslim world.
guest Wednesday, March 26, 2008
It is the lack of HIV related education such as how to prevent HIV infection and how to stop spreading the same once a person is infected requires to be first addressed by wild display of all kind including in the public toilets and public transports.
guest Tuesday, February 19, 2008
if this had been so , then most ppl tobe effected are going to be from India whre hindus dont go for circumcision, where as in Africa most men go for it. Then why the Aids satrted and is a bigger problme there. In India its bigger problme in Arunachal whre teh circumcision is at all time high due to population being Christian.
guest Sunday, December 30, 2007
We have to educate the people who doesn't know any thing about prevention so we conduct road shows like slide show in rural areas -coli workers - drivers - travellers
guest Thursday, December 27, 2007

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