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Loud Traffic Noise Boosts Stroke Risk in Elderly

by VR Sreeraman on  January 27, 2011 at 12:41 PM Senior Health News   - G J E 4
A survey of more than 50,000 people indicate that exposure to road traffic noise from cars and trucks can raise boost the risk for stroke, especially among the elderly.
 Loud Traffic Noise Boosts Stroke Risk in Elderly
Loud Traffic Noise Boosts Stroke Risk in Elderly
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The study further adds that every 10 additional decibels of road noise led to an increase of 14 percent in the probability of a stroke when averaged for all age groups.

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For those under 65, the risk was not statistically significant. But the risk was weighted hugely in the over-65 group, where it rose 27 percent for each 10 decibel increment.

Above 60 decibels or so, the danger of stroke increased even more, the researchers found.

A busy street can easily generate noise levels of 70 or 80 decibels. By comparison, a lawnmower or a chainsaw gives off 90 or 100 decibels, while a nearby jet plane taking off typically measures 120 decibels.

"Previous studies have linked traffic noise with raised blood pressure and heart attacks," said lead researcher Mette Sorensena of the Danish Cancer Society.

"Our study shows that exposure to road traffic noise seems to increase the risk of stroke."

The study reviewed the medical and residency histories of 51,485 people who had participated in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health survey, conducted in and around Copenhagen between 1993 and 1997.

A total of 1,881 people suffered a stroke during this period.

Eight percent of all stroke cases, and 19 percent of cases in those aged over 65, could be attributed to road traffic noise, according to the paper.

The researchers suggest noise acts as a stressor and disturbs sleep, which results in increased blood pressure and heart rate, as well as increased level of stress hormones.

The study factored in the effect of air pollution, exposure to railway and aircraft noise, and a range of potentially confounding lifestyle factors such as smoking, diet and alcohol consumption.

The survey cohort lived mainly in urban areas and was thus not representative of the whole population in terms of exposure to road traffic noise.

Proximity to road noise is also related to social class, as wealthier people can afford to live in quieter areas.

Source: AFP
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Noise pollutions is not good. As what this study confirms, it also increases the chance of having a stroke. There should be a law passed that limits traffic noises.
ennairam_23 Tuesday, February 1, 2011

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