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Kids Exposed to Family Stress at Risk of Developing Depression, Anxiety

by VR Sreeraman on  June 22, 2008 at 12:14 PM Child Health News   - G J E 4
 Kids Exposed to Family Stress at Risk of Developing Depression, Anxiety
Small children who are exposed to familial stress are at higher risk of developing anxious and depressive symptoms in early adolescence, a new study has found.
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The doctorate study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) showed that children who grow up in a family where the mother has psychological distress, the family is exposed to stress or is lacking social support, are more likely to develop emotional problems.

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Girls are more vulnerable than boys, and very timid or short-tempered children are more vulnerable than others to develop emotional problems, the study said. nxiety and depression are two of the most common mental problems for children and adolescents.

Contributing factors to the development of symptoms of anxiety and depression while growing up is the key focus in the doctorate project by Evalill Karevold at the NIPH.

10-20pc of all children and young people will, in the course of growing up, display enough symptoms of anxiety and depression to qualify for a diagnosis.

Karevold has followed more than 900 families from when the children were 18 months old through to adolescence (data from the NIPH's TOPP-study). The findings are based on maternal and child report of the child's symptoms of anxiety and depression, plus reports from the mother about risk and protective factors in the family environment.

A main finding highlights the importance of environmental factors for families with children less than 5 years of age.

Maternal distress symptoms, family stress and lack of social support in their children's growing-up environment in pre-school age leads to an increase in anxiety and depression symptoms when these children reach 12-13 years old.

In addition, the results show that girls are more likely to develop emotional problems at 12-13 years of age than boys.

The research indicates that girls tend to churn over problems and events more than boys. In addition, early puberty in girls is thought to make them extra vulnerable to developing depressive symptoms, said Karevold.

The results also suggest that there can be two central developmental paths to emotional problems in early adolescence. One path goes through the child's temperament, especially temperamental emotionality (tendency to react quickly and intensely). A different course goes through the environmental factors that are present when the children are at pre-school age.

Source: ANI
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