Four Glasses of Milk Daily Significantly Cuts Bone Fracture Risk

by Hannah Punitha on  June 10, 2008 at 5:13 PM Research News   - G J E 4
 Four Glasses of Milk Daily Significantly Cuts Bone Fracture Risk
Four glasses of milk daily can significantly cut the risk of bone fractures in adults, suggests a new study.

The study from University Hospital Zurich and Dartmouth Medical School has found that boosting calcium intake by drinking milk can significantly reduce healthy adults' chances of a debilitating bone break.

Researchers claim that healthy men and women supplemented with 1,200 mg of calcium per day, the amount in four glasses of milk, reduced their risk of bone fractures by 72 percent.

The study involved 930 healthy men and women ages 27 to 80. The participants were divided into two groups for a four-year intervention study.

One group was given a placebo, while the other took a daily calcium supplement containing 1,200 mg of calcium daily - the calcium recommendation for adults over the age of 51.

The results showed that those receiving an additional 1,200 mg of calcium were significantly less likely to have a bone fracture of any sort during the four-year period, including everyday activity fractures (bone breaks that occurred while walking or standing) and seemingly unavoidable accident-related fractures (bone breaks sustained during falls, running, sports injuries or car accidents).

In fact, during the four-year intervention, not a single adult receiving calcium experienced a fracture tied to everyday activities - fractures that researchers call "potentially preventable" and more likely linked to bone health.

The researchers suggest that adults are required to maintain their calcium intakes.

Adult bones continue to grow in density and strength until about age 35. After that, preventing further bone loss is essential. Poor bone health and bone fractures can have negative consequences for adults of all ages, interfering with recreational activities, ability to work or physical capacity to exercise and stay healthy.

The study is published study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Source: ANI

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