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Finally, Bird Flu Researchers Agree to 2-Month Halt

by Kathy Jones on  January 21, 2012 at 8:09 PM Research News   - G J E 4
A temporary two-month halt to controversial research on a bird flu virus that may be easily passed among humans has been agreed to by international scientists.
 Finally, Bird Flu Researchers Agree to 2-Month Halt
Finally, Bird Flu Researchers Agree to 2-Month Halt
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Two separate teams of researchers, one in the Netherlands and the other in the United States, found ways late last year to engineer the H5N1 virus so that it was transmitted among mammals, something that has previously been rare.

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The breakthrough raised alarm that the method could fall into the wrong hands and unleash a massive flu pandemic that could cost millions of lives, and a US advisory panel in December urged that key details remain unpublished.

"Resulting from concerns about recent research on avian influenza, scientists working on transmission of the H5N1 strain have agreed to halt this area of research for 60 days to allow time for international discussion," said the letter from the researchers, published by the journals Science and Nature.

"We recognize that we and the rest of the scientific community need to clearly explain the benefits of this important research and the measures taken to minimize its possible risks," it added.

"We propose to do so in an international forum in which the scientific community comes together to discuss and debate these issues."

The US journal Science and the British magazine Nature have been working with researchers on edits to the manuscripts but have not said when or if they would eventually be published.

Until now, bird flu has been rare in humans, but particularly fatal in those who do get sick. H5N1 first infected humans in 1997 and has killed more than one in every two people that it infected, for a total of 350 deaths.

The concern is the virus could mutate and mimic past pandemic flu outbreaks such as the "Spanish flu" of 1918-1919 which killed 50 million people, and outbreaks in 1957 and 1968 that killed three million.

Source: AFP
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