Facebookers Reveal Their Real Personalities, Not Fake Virtual Ones

by Tanya Thomas on  December 5, 2009 at 10:57 AM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
 Facebookers Reveal Their Real Personalities, Not Fake Virtual Ones
A recent research has found that the pre-conceived notions of social networking and unreal virtual images is all trash. It says that people use online socializing hotspots such as Facebook to express and communicate real personality, instead of an idealized virtual identity.

Psychologist Sam Gosling at The University of Texas at Austin said: "I was surprised by the findings because the widely held assumption is that people are using their profiles to promote an enhanced impression of themselves."

The expert added: "In fact, our findings suggest that online social networking profiles convey rather accurate images of the profile owners, either because people aren't trying to look good or because they are trying and failing to pull it off.

"These findings suggest that online social networks are not so much about providing positive spin for the profile owners," he adds, "but are instead just another medium for engaging in genuine social interactions, much like the telephone."

To reach the conclusion, Gosling and a team of researchers collected 236 profiles of college-aged people from the United States (Facebook) and Germany (StudiVZ, SchuelerVZ). The researchers used questionnaires to assess the profile owners' actual personality characteristics as well as their ideal-personality traits (how they wished to be). The personality traits included: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness.

In the study, observers rated the profiles of people they did not know. These ratings were then compared to the profile owners' actual personality and their ideal-personality.

ersonality impressions based on online social network profiles were accurate and were not affected by profile owners' self-idealization.

Accuracy was strongest for extraversion - paralleling results of face-to-face encounters - and lowest for neuroticism. Those findings were consistent with previous research showing that neuroticism is difficult to detect without being in person.

"I think that being able to express personality accurately contributes to the popularity of online social networks in two ways," says Gosling. "First, it allows profile owners to let others know who they are and, in doing so, satisfies a basic need to be known by others. Second, it means that profile viewers feel they can trust the information they glean from online social network profiles, building their confidence in the system as a whole."

Source: ANI

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All