Medindia

X

Diabetes, Obesity, Hypertension Up Mortality in Hepatitis C Patients

by VR Sreeraman on  April 24, 2009 at 4:34 PM Research News   - G J E 4
 Diabetes, Obesity, Hypertension Up Mortality in Hepatitis C Patients
Type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension are associated with overall and liver related mortality in hepatitis C (HCV) infected patients, a new research has claimed.
Advertisement

The specific impact of metabolic syndrome on mortality in hepatitis C patients has been revealed by new research to be presented on Sunday April 26 at EASL 2009, the Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Advertisement
In HCV-infected patients, the top three predictors of liver related mortality were having higher body mass index (BMI), presence of insulin resistance (IR) and elevated serum cholesterol. Overall mortality in HCV patients was most linked to metabolic syndrome, higher BMI and hypertension.

Metabolic syndrome is a combination of medical problems that increase risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Recent data have suggested that metabolic syndrome is associated with adverse outcomes in HCV patients. This study set out to assess which aspects of metabolic syndrome are of most risk to such HCV patients and to quantify their specific impact on mortality.

Professor Zobair Younossi MD, MPH from the Center for Liver Diseases at Inova Fairfax Hospital and the Executive Director of Betty and Guy Beatty's Center for Integrated Research, Virginia, USA, who led the study, said: "Exploring the risk factors associated with adverse outcomes in HCV patients helps us to better understand the complex nature of this highly prevalent disease.

"This study shows a clear association between key components of metabolic syndrome and mortality in HCV patients and demonstrates the importance of lifestyle improvements and coaching in the management of HCV patients, to potentially minimise the onset and impact of metabolic syndrome and its associated mortality risks."

Researchers in this study utilised the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and Linked Mortality Files. HCV was defined as positive HCV RNA by PCR assay. Subjects without other causes of chronic liver disease such as presumed NAFLD with elevated serum aminotransferases, excessive alcohol use, elevated transferrin saturation and positive hepatitis Bs antigen were designated controls without liver disease. HCV patients were compared to HCV-negative individuals and controls without liver disease using Rao-Scott chi-square statistics.

Adjusted hazard ratios for overall mortality and cause-specific mortality were calculated for HCV patients using persons without HCV. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for calculation of AHR for independent risk factors, and for the presence of HCV as a potential risk factor for overall mortality and cause-specific mortalities.

The cohort included 15,866 individuals with complete data.

Source: ANI
LIN
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All