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China Bans Use of Bisphenol A in Babies' Bottles

by VR Sreeraman on  June 03, 2011 at 2:28 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
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China has banned the use of Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, in the production of babies' bottles in order to protect the health of infants.

BPA is widely used in the production of plastics, including tableware and beverage containers.
 China Bans Use of Bisphenol A in Babies' Bottles
China Bans Use of Bisphenol A in Babies' Bottles

It BPA is now considered to be an endocrine disruptor and experts said it could lead to the early sexual development of children and may cause cancer.

The Ministry of Health and five other ministries issued a joint notice on their websites calling for an end to the production of such bottles, The China Daily reports.

An official from the health ministry explained that people sometimes put milk in nursing bottles and then heat them, which makes it more likely that the BPA in the bottles will leech into the milk.

The notice from the ministries also asked local food security inspectors to be vigilant in looking out for violations of the ban.

The use of BPA was banned in Canada in September 2010 and in the European Union in March.

BPA is not the only endocrine disruptor babies are exposed to. Nearly 70 such chemicals have been identified. Although some are already forbidden under the law, others remain in use in the production of plastic containers, toys and pesticides.

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