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Cancer Cure in Daffodils

by Rathi Manohar on  November 3, 2010 at 8:24 PM Alternative Medicine News   - G J E 4
Aggressive forms of human brain cancers could be treated with narciclasine, a natural compound and a potential powerful therapeutic, found in daffodil bulbs, claim scientists.
 Cancer Cure in Daffodils
Cancer Cure in Daffodils
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"We are planning to move a narciclasine derivative toward clinical trials in oncology within a three to four year period in order to help patients with brain cancers, including gliomas, as well as brain metastases," said Robert Kiss, co-author of the study from the Laboratory of Toxicology at the Institute of Pharmacy at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium.

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"We hope narciclasine could be given to brain cancer patients in addition to conventional therapies."

To make this discovery, Kiss and colleagues used computer-assisted techniques to identify targets for narciclasine in cancer cells. The strongest potential candidate to emerge was the eEF1A elongation factor.

Researchers then grafted human melanoma brain metastatic cells into the brains of genetically altered mice. Results showed that the injected mice survived significantly longer when treated with narciclasine than those mice left untreated. The researchers believe that narciclasine selectively inhibits the proliferation of very aggressive cancer cells, while avoiding adverse effects on normal cells. Narciclasine could be used in the near future to combat brain cancers, including gliomas, and metastases such as melanoma brain metastases.

"Scientists have been digging in odd corners to find effective treatments for brain cancer for decades, and now they've found one in daffodils." said Gerald Weissmann, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal.

"It doesn't mean that you should eat daisies or daffodils for what ails you, but that modern medicinal chemistry can pluck new chemicals from stuff that grows in the garden. This is a good one!"

A new research study has been published in the November 2010 print issue of The FASEB Journal.

Source: ANI
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