Brits Experiencing Moth Trouble With Their Cashmeres

by VR Sreeraman on  June 26, 2007 at 9:00 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
Brits Experiencing Moth Trouble With Their Cashmeres
Pest control experts in Britain have claimed that the popularity of cashmere, which is cheaper and more readily available than ever has meant more and more people are experiencing trouble with moths.

Pest control company Rentokil was quoted by Scotsman as saying that the number of calls received to deal with moths has risen by 25 per cent over the last year.

"We're currently receiving a high number of calls about moths. There is a real problem which appears to have been caused by the warmer winter and greater use of central heating. Cashmere has become particularly popular recently and moths love it," a company spokesman said.

However, environmentalists such as Sir David Attenborough say moths are under threat and 53 species have been listed as a priority for conservation.

Naturalists say moths are the recyclers of the natural world, breaking down fur, wool and feathers in the wild. Only two of the 2,500 species in Britain are known to eat clothes.

Here are ten ways to keep your clothes from becoming a moth meal.

Moth Balls: Soaked with a noxious cocktail of chemical insecticide and deodorant, mothballs are the traditional way of dealing with the household moth. Soaked in naphalene they emit a gas poisonous to moths and their larvae.

Freeze your Cashmeres: Keeping your cashmere in the deep freeze may seem extreme but many believe it is the best solution to moths. Moths cannott survive in sub zero temperatures so freezing is a sure fire way to make sure your cardie stays hole free.

Hang your clothes: Dropping your jumpers and cardies on the floor can be a disaster if you want to avoid moths. The little blighters love to lay their eggs in carpets - so leave clothes lying round and they are likely to end up full of holes. Hanging them up is better.

Zip up your Cashmeres: Cashmere shops like Belinda Robertson in Edinburgh sell all their jumpers and cardigans with special zip-up bags. Stow your special knitwear inside the bags and it is more likely to survive the onslaught of the dastardly moths.

Bog Myrtle:The traditional Highland method for dealing with unwanted beasties was to keep a sprig of bog myrtle in your wardrobe. The fragrant shrub is an excellent natural insect repellent, keeping moths and other insects away.

Cedar Wood: Many cashmere shops suggest using cedar blocks or cedar balls to keep the nasty moths away from your precious woollies. Cedar wood has a strong medicinal smelling resin which doesn't fade and which moths can't stand.

Lavender: Using a lavender scented laundry spray or keeping wooden balls soaked in lavender oil at the bottom of your wardrobe could keep moths at bay. Not only does lavender smell rather lovely it is also one of nature's natural insect repellents.

Dry Clean:The chemicals in dry cleaning fluid kill moths and their larvae so regular dry cleaning will help your cashmere last longer. Unfortunately the effects don't last - so once your cardie is back in the wardrobe the moths attack again.

Exterminate:Professional extermination is one way to deal with moths. Pest control officers will spray your bedding, your carpets, your clothes and your wardrobe to get rid of all the live moths, eggs and larvae in one deadly swoop.

Use a napkin:Some ladies who lunch swear moths are attracted to clothes which have food spilt on them. As well as keeping woollens clean you can wear a napkin over your cashmere jumper to make sure it doesn't become extra tasty.

Source: ANI

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