Blood Vessels are the ‘Pied Piper’ for Growing Nerve Cells: Study

by Medindia Content Team on  April 12, 2008 at 12:37 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Blood Vessels are the ‘Pied Piper’ for Growing Nerve Cells: Study
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have shown that the blood vessels in the body act as the 'pied piper' for growing nerve cells, by discovering that blood vessels in the head can direct growing facial nerve cells with blood pressure controlling proteins.

According to the researchers, their findings suggest that blood vessels throughout the body might have the same power of influence over many nerves.

"We're excited to have stumbled across another family of proteins that can tell a growing nerve which way to grow," Nature quoted David Ginty, Ph.D., a professor of neuroscience at Hopkins and investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

"But the really interesting thing is that the nerves appear to use blood vessels as guideposts to direct their growth in one of several possible directions," he added.

For the study, the scientists examined in mice a group of about 15,000 nerve cells known as the superior cervical ganglia, or SCG, which extend projections that innervate various structures in the head including the eyes, mouth and salivary glands.

The SCG sits in a Y-like branching point of the blood vessel in the neck that supplies the head with blood, the carotid artery. In the developing embryo, nerve projections grow out of the SCG and grow along one of the two branches of the carotid artery; the nerves that grow along the internal carotid innervate the eyes and mouth among other head structures, and those that grow along the external carotid innervate the salivary glands.

To discover how nerve cells "choose" to grow along the external carotid artery to innervate the salivary glands, the team looked for genes that appear to be preferentially turned on in the external carotid, and off in the internal carotid.

"There's only two directions they can go and we wanted to know if they choose their direction or if the decision to go one way or the other is random," Ginty said.

They found one gene that is expressed preferentially in the external carotid, a gene that makes the blood pressure regulating protein, endothelin, active.

"It comes as no surprise that something critical for regulating the cardiovascular system in the adult also is used for directing nerve growth in the developing embryo. The genome is limited and nature has figured out a way to use things over and over again for unrelated functions," Ginty said.

Additional inspection of the arteries in mouse embryos confirmed that endothelin is found only in the external carotid. To confirm that the nerve cell projections grow toward endothelin, the researchers removed SCGs and grew each one next to an endothelin-soaked bead.

When the team checked on them three days later, the team found that nerves from the SCGs had grown towards the beads. To be certain that endothelin directs nerve growth in the living animal, the researchers then looked in mice that had the endothelin gene removed.

Needless to say, these mice had no nerves growing along their external carotid arteries.

The team then speculated if all growing nerves in the SCG could respond to endothelin. So they looked for the endothelin receptors in SCG nerves and found only a subset of SCG nerves make endothelin receptors.

The team concluded that those nerves one way or another already had been chosen to respond to the endothelin made by the external carotid.

"How do these nerve cells know which target organ they're supposed to innervate when they all come from the same progenitor?" said Ginty.

"This is what we're going to study next," he added.

The findings are published this week in Nature.

Source: ANI

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