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UAPD Claims State Has Done Little To Fix Doctor Shortage at Prisons

Friday, November 4, 2016 Medico Legal News J E 4
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OAKLAND, Calif., Nov. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On Tuesday the State's Office of the Inspector General issued a report that gave Salinas Valley State Prison (SVSP) a failing grade for the medical care it provides to inmates at the Soledad facility.  Fifteen years after a lawsuit in which a federal judge ruled that the health care given in California prisons constituted "cruel and unusual punishment," the Inspector General found that SVSP still demonstrates "a profound inability to provide patients with adequate access to care."

Much of the problem comes from an on-going shortage of physicians in California prisons.  According to the Inspector General's report: "Of critical importance was SVSP's shortage of providers and extreme difficulty with recruitment and retention of qualified physicians. This inadequate staffing at SVSP led to an institutional backlog of over 400 patients at the time of the onsite inspection, and contributed to the inadequate rating."

Currently, there are four physicians working onsite at Salinas Valley State Prison, treating over 3800 prisoners.  The physician shortage is a pervasive problem affecting most of the 34 state adult prisons in California.

On Wednesday the Associated Press reported that California Correctional Health Care Services (CCHCS) spokesperson Joyce Hayhoe "agreed that the prison has a serious, ongoing doctor shortage and said officials are trying to hire doctors."  However, the Union of American Physicians and Dentists (UAPD), which is now negotiating with the State on behalf of prison doctors, believes not enough is being done.  UAPD asserts that recruitment and retention is still a serious problem that is affecting patient care.

"The State can't hire more doctors because doctors can work elsewhere with better compensation and working conditions," reported Dr. Stuart A. Bussey, president of UAPD.  "At the bargaining table we've made multiple proposals that would help with prison doctor recruitment, but the State has said no to every one of them."  

"These are not easy patients," according to Dr. Fernando Tuvera, a physician at SVSP. "I am moved from unit to unit, treating people with injuries, Hepatitis C, end-stage liver disease, COPD, diabetes, and many other conditions.  We work long hours during the day, and the four of us have to divide up all the after-hours coverage too.  That means one week per month I'm working all day and all night.  We need more doctors here."

The Union has also filed grievances at SVSP over the effects of inadequate staffing on the few remaining doctors, and proposed remedies that would help alleviate the strain.  Those grievances were denied by CCHCS.

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/uapd-claims-state-has-done-little-to-fix-doctor-shortage-at-prisons-300357120.html

SOURCE Union of American Physicians and Dentists

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