Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Patent Granted to Dimera

Friday, September 18, 2009 General News
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PORTLAND, Ore., Aug. 11 The U.S. Patent and Trade Office (USPTO) plans to announce patent award approval on August 11 to Dimera Incorporated for treatment of symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD), which is alternatively known as Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD).

"Method and Kit for reducing the symptoms of peripheral vascular disease," (Number 7572780) covers the period August 11, 2009 through July 28, 2024. Dimera President, Prof. R. Kent Hermsmeyer, said, "We are pleased to announce perhaps the most important of the Dimera patents to date. Dimera plans to further optimize our success in demonstrating the virtues of our advanced transdermal strategy that we have extensively documented in primates to greatly extend normal function in the peripheral circulation."

Hermsmeyer explains that, "The loss of normal function of blood vessels explains deterioration of the peripheral circulation, and that decline in function with age now appears to be preventable. If women and men at the peak of cardiovascular health used our discovery to counter the avoidable fall in essential molecular function - which we have identified and mapped - then the expectation of reduced mobility and even disability with advancing age might be dispelled. Rather than addressing only the symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, Dimera has taken the demanding - but arguably more powerful - approach that demands discovery and understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism at the gene level."

The significance of this patent is one of the premiere successful translations of science - cell and molecular biology - to clinically effective medicine.

About Dimera

Founded by world-renown researchers in 1997 as a pure R&D biotech, Dimera (www.dimera.net) has evolved into a drug development firm specializing in cardiovascular and smooth muscle diseases. Dimera has leveraged its expertise in physiology and biophysics into discovery of clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. A systems approach integrating extensive preclinical coronary catheterization and molecular research have produced incisive definition of the molecular mechanism of action for steroid-mediated gene expression control.

Dimera's new drug platform is based on the discovery that low steroid levels directly control smooth muscle gene expression and thus reactivity. Smooth muscle in the wall of blood vessels, airways, and the bladder constitutes the essential (functional final common path) control element. In many cardiovascular diseases, vascular and visceral smooth muscle cell dysfunctions are a dominant direct cause of excessive constriction and obstructed flow.

SOURCE Dimera Incorporated


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