Medindia

X

Paul Sullivan's Legacy: An Early Warning Program for Detecting Melanoma Before It's Too Late

Friday, October 10, 2008 General News J E 4
Advertisement
Leading Melanoma Specialists Will Give Accredited Course for Non-Dermatologists about Detection and Management of Melanoma



To be held November 1, 2008 at the Royal Sonesta Hotel Boston, Cambridge, MA



CONCORD, Mass., Oct. 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Melanoma Foundation of New England and the Boston University School of Medicine are co-sponsoring an Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) course to update non-dermatologists on the detection and management of melanoma. The course is given through the Foundation's Paul Sullivan Melanoma Institute developed to educate healthcare providers in the early detection and management of melanoma, in an effort to reduce the devastating effects of the disease. Paul Sullivan, a columnist for the Lowell Sun and a talk show host at WBZ radio, lost his battle with melanoma in 2007. Paul was an advocate for early detection of skin cancer and melanoma.



Melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is nearly 100% treatable if detected early. However, if it is not, melanoma is likely to spread to other parts of the body where it becomes hard to treat and can be fatal. It was Paul Sullivan's strong belief that the best way to combat melanoma deaths is by training health care professionals who see our skin to give us more regular and effective skin examinations. Paul was a great supporter of the Foundation and became closely involved with our programs toward the end of his life.



"According to a recent survey, 23% of graduating medical students had never observed skin cancer examinations, 26.7% had received no training, and 43.4% had never performed the examination. Fifty-seven percent had spent no time in a dermatology clinic," says Deb Girard, Executive Director of the Melanoma Foundation of New England. "This course is intended specifically to provide pertinent information to the non-dermatologist about identifying patients at risk for melanoma, providing counseling for high-risk patients, as well as screening for early melanoma."



Family physicians, primary care internists, geriatricians, obstetricians, gynecologists, nurse practitioners, residents, physician assistants, and fellow should attend. Speakers include: Alan C. Geller, M.P.H., R.N., Research Associate Professor of Dermatology and Epidemiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston University School of Public Health; Hensin Tsao, M.D., Ph.D., Director, MGH Melanoma and Pigmented Lesion Center, Director, MGH Melanoma Genetics Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Associate Professor of Dermatology Harvard Medical School; Marie-Grance Demierre, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine; Martin A. Weinstock, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Dermatology and Community Health, Brown University.



To register for the course or for more information visit www.mfne.org or www.bu.edu/cme, call 617-638-4605 or email cme@bu.edu.



The Melanoma Foundation of New England is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating the public about the importance of early detection and prevention, and helping patients and their caregivers cope with melanoma. Skin cancer is the number one diagnosed cancer in the United States. Melanoma is the most preventable cancer. The Foundation was founded in 1999 and is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides educational programs, support groups, and advocacy for melanoma patients. Learn more about the Foundation at: www.mfne.org.



SOURCE Melanoma Foundation of New England
Advertisement


Advertisement

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
I agree to the terms and conditions
s
Science Fiction Has Become Reality with Remarkable...
S
40 Million Americans Endure Anxiety Everyday