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Mosquitoes 2016: New Survey Says Americans Don't Follow CDC And Expert Advice About Protecting Themselves, Families And Pets From Mosquitoes

Friday, April 29, 2016 Research News J E 4
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RICHMOND, Va., April 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Despite recent news that Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that can carry Zika, Chikungunya and other viruses, has spread to 30 states, the majority of Americans have yet to embrace basic recommendations to help reduce the mosquito population at their own homes.

That's the result of a new survey fielded by TNS Global detailing homeowners' knowledge of steps to reduce mosquitoes in their yards.  According to The Mosquito Squad Fight the Bite Report, nearly three quarters of Americans (74%) do not plan to modify their time outside this year due to mosquito activity, yet less than half (49%) follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation to use mosquito repellent and just a third (36%) remove standing water, a simple task also recommended by the CDC, to reduce mosquito breeding.

"Unlike Chikungunya and West Nile virus, Zika has been identified as a world health crisis and we must work together on personal, local and global levels to fight mosquitoes," said Scott Zide, president and COO of Outdoor Living Brands and co-founder of Mosquito Squad, the largest and most experienced home and commercial mosquito control firm in the country. "Removal of standing water is the most essential tactic in mosquito elimination yet homeowners aren't actively removing it, which is surprising given that mosquito concerns are so high."

According to Zide, just as surprising was the finding that 46 percent said they did not plan to do anything different in their yards, despite recent news of the Zika virus. Findings from the survey:

  • Only 36 percent of Americans turn over toys or items in their yards that contain water
  • Less than half (44%) throw out lawn debris, under which mosquitoes can breed
  • Just a quarter of Americans (25%) shake out tarps, including BBQ and fire pit covers, to remove water that accumulates
  • Less than 27 percent make sure their gutters are clean
  • More than a quarter (27%) walk their yard regularly to remove items that can harbor mosquitoes

"Although Zika has yet to be transmitted by mosquitoes in the U.S., public health experts do expect that it soon will, and we're encouraging homeowners to walk their yards to check for ways to eliminate mosquitoes," Zide said. Mosquito Squad professional tips include:

TIP over anything that holds or collects water. A bottle cap filled with water holds enough water for mosquitoes to breed. Since mosquitoes breed in standing water, the elimination of standing water decreases a mosquito's breeding ground. Mosquito Squad technicians report that yards with bird baths, play sets with tire swings, tree houses, portable fireplaces and pits and catch basins are the biggest offenders.

TOSS any yard trash including clippings, leaves and twigs. Even the smallest items can provide a haven for mosquitoes to breed and increase the population. 

TURN over items that could hold water and trash. Look for children's portable sandboxes, slides or plastic toys; underneath and around downspouts; in plant saucers, empty pots, light fixtures and dog water bowls. Eliminate these items or keep them turned over until used.

REMOVE TARPS that can catch water. Many homeowners have tarps or covers on items residing in their outdoor spaces. If not stretched taut, they are holding water. Check tarps over firewood piles, portable fire places, recycling cans, boats, sports equipment and grills. Mosquito Squad suggests using bungee cords to secure tarps in the yard.

TAKE CARE of your home. Proper maintenance can be a deciding factor in property values and mosquito bites. Regularly clean out gutters and make sure downspouts are attached properly. Mosquito Squad recommends re-grading areas where water stands more than a few hours, and to regularly check irrigation systems to ensure that they aren't leaking and causing a breeding haven. Keep lawn height low and areas weed-free. 

TEAM UP. Despite taking all precautions in your own home, talking with neighbors is a key component to mosquito control. Townhomes and homes with little space between lots mean that mosquitoes can breed at a neighbor's home, and affect your property.

TREAT. Utilize a professional mosquito elimination barrier treatment around the home and yard. Using a barrier treatment at home reduces the need for using DEET-containing bug spray on both humans and pets.   

Individuals who want a more comprehensive mosquito control treatment can utilize Mosquito Squad, which uses the latest EPA-registered mosquito control barrier treatments, larvicide and all-natural substances to eliminate mosquitoes from yards and outdoor spaces.

About Mosquito Squad 

With approximately 200 franchise locations nationwide, Mosquito Squad specializes in eliminating mosquitoes and ticks from outdoor living spaces, allowing Americans to enjoy their yards, outdoor living spaces, special events and green spaces. The Squad, the first and original mosquito control expert, has delivered more treatments than anyone in the industry and has been a proud supporter of Malaria No More since 2011.  For more information, visit www.MosquitoSquad.com, www.MosquitoSquadFranchise.com and www.OutdoorLivingBrands.com.   

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mosquitoes-2016--new-survey-says-americans-dont-follow-cdc-and-expert-advice-about-protecting-themselves-families-and-pets-from-mosquitoes-300259657.html

SOURCE Mosquito Squad

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