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Let it Snow, Let it Snow, Let it Snow

Wednesday, December 3, 2008 General News J E 4
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Don't let snow shoveling ruin your winter wonderland



ROSEMONT, Ill., Dec. 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Snow shoveling tends to be an unpleasant task -- this mundane seasonal chore combines heavy lifting and cold weather, resulting in possible injuries to the back, shoulder muscles if shovelers do not take the proper precautions. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) (www.aaos.org) has recommendations to help you stay safe while clearing snow so you can still have some winter fun.



According to the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission:





"People tend to think of snow removal as just another household task, but it really involves a lot of bending and heavy lifting, particularly in wet snow," says Robert Dunbar, MD, spokesperson for the AAOS and member of the Academy's Leadership Fellows Program. "It may be especially dangerous for people who do not regularly exercise (http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00418), as their bodies, specifically backs, shoulder and arm muscles may not be prepared for that level of activity."



The Academy offers the following tips to prevent injuries while shoveling and using a snowblower:





Shoveling:



Snowblowing:



More tips on snow shoveling safety (http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00060&return_link=0)



www.orthoinfo.org



About AAOS (www6.aaos.org/news/Pemr/releases/release_boiler.cfm?category=6&releasenum=705)



-- In 2007, more than 118,000 people were treated in hospital emergency rooms, doctors' offices, clinics and other medical settings for injuries sustained while shoveling or otherwise removing ice and snow manually. -- In that same year, more than 15,000 were injured using snowblowers. This is three times as many snowblower injuries than in 2006. -- Types of injuries can include sprains and strains (http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00111), particularly in the back and shoulders, as well as lacerations and finger amputations.

SOURCE American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
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