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Hastings & Hastings Speaks on the Danger of Summer and Leaving Kids in Cars

Monday, May 16, 2016 Child Health News J E 4
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PHOENIX, May 16, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Phoenix, Arizona, world-renowned for its incredible weather nine months of the year, is equally notorious for turning into a scorching inferno for the remaining three months. Already, temperatures are creeping towards triple digits and Phoenicians are preparing themselves for a brutally hot summer. Long-time residents of Phoenix are familiar with it takes to survive summer in style. They crank up the air conditioning, spend time by the pool, or flee to cooler climates. However, even for experienced summer survivors, there is risk associated with the warmest months of the year.

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Heatstroke is one of the leading causes of death among children. Since 1990, more than 600 children have passed away as a result of heatstroke caused by being left in the car. Hastings & Hastings laments each and every one of these unfortunate and preventable deaths. Children are much more vulnerable to heatstroke than adults. The symptoms of heatstroke can develop within minutes. There is no period of time in which it is safe to leave a child in the car during the summer.

Christopher McStay, MD, an emergency room doctor and assistant professor of emergency medicine at New York University Langone Medical Center has stated, "It is never OK to leave kids or pets in a car -- even with the windows down. It is an absolute no-no."

Typically, parents will leave a child in the car because they do not understand the full extent of the danger. The temperature inside a car can increase as much as 30 degrees above the temperature outside within just an hour. 70 percent of this increase occurs within the first 30 minutes.

Heat stroke occurs when internal body temperature rises above 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms such as dizziness, confusion, seizures, and loss of consciousness may occur. Extreme cases may result in death.

To prevent heatstroke, never leave a child in the car. Parents and caregivers should double check that a sleeping child is not left in the backseat. The car should always be kept locked to prevent children from wandering in and become trapped. Finally, if individuals see a child left in the car, they should call 911 immediately. Every second counts. 

About Hastings & Hastings Hastings & Hastings is an Arizona consumer law firm. We are an experienced trial law firm that represents personal injury and wrongful death victims at a Discount Fee.

Contact Information Kristy Guell (480) 706-1100 kristy.guell@hastingsandhastings.com  http://hastingsandhastings.com

This content was issued through the press release distribution service at Newswire.com. For more info visit: http://www.newswire.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hastings--hastings-speaks-on-the-danger-of-summer-and-leaving-kids-in-cars-300264877.html

SOURCE Hastings & Hastings

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