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Foundation for Biomedical Research Wins Six Telly Awards in 31st Annual Competition

Thursday, June 24, 2010 Hospital News J E 4
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The awards recognize outstanding television production

WASHINGTON, June 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) announced today it has won six Telly Awards during the 2009/2010 season in the 31st annual Telly Awards competition. Founded in 1978, the Telly Awards honor outstanding local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs, the finest video and film productions, and online film and video.

"It's quite a challenge to produce award-winning television on a subject as complex as biomedical research," said FBR president Frankie Trull. "But we strive to illustrate the partnership that exists between bench researchers and bedside clinicians who work tirelessly to find cures and treatments for patients suffering through disease and debilitating conditions. All of our programs are filmed through the eyes of the patient experience."

FBR earned four Telly Awards for its half-hour TV show, "SurvivorTales: Jen's Story," which follows the emotional storyline of a breast cancer researcher fighting her own battle with stage four breast cancer. This long-form program was honored in the categories of documentary, health and fitness, medical research and charitable/not-for-profit. FBR's 60-second "Jen's Story, II" spot also won a Telly.

In addition to its five Telly Awards for television, FBR also received a Telly for its outdoor billboard campaign called "Ever Had Leprosy?" which tied into its regional and multi-cable TV PSA campaign. Over the past three years, FBR has won 12 Telly Awards.

Established in 1981, FBR is the nation's oldest and largest organization devoted to educating the public about the essential role of biomedical research in the quest for medical advancements, treatments, and cures for both humans and animals. For more information visit www.fbresearch.org.

SOURCE Foundation for Biomedical Research
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