General Anesthesia

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About General Anesthesia

The word "anesthesia" comes from a Greek word meaning absence or loss of sensation. Different types of anesthesia are used in procedures such as tooth extractions to complex procedures such as heart surgery. The anesthesia is used to block pain signals traveling through the nervous system. The type of anesthesia that is to be delivered will depend on:

The general health condition,

The type of surgery and other clinical consideration.

A careful consultation with the Anaesthetist and Surgeon can help determine the type of anesthesia that is required for the procedure.

General anesthesia is usually administered when there is a need for more extensive surgery. This form of anesthesia is nothing more than putting a patient to sleep until the surgery is over. While this is being done, the functioning of other vital organs such as the heart, kidney and lungs is monitored constantly.

General Anesthesia is usually administered through an intravenous route or through inhalation. From this point one will not be aware of anything else during the operation. Following this, a tube called as the endotracheal tube or the breathing tube is placed inside the windpipe. The tube is connected to a machine that delivers oxygen and removes carbondioxide from the lungs.
General Anesthesia

The set up ensure that the oxygen required for breathing and anaesthetic gases are delivered properly. A monitor can be used to determine whether the tube is properly positioned and whether adequate ventilation is provided throughout the surgery.

During the entire surgical procedure the heart rate, blood pressure and the oxygen level in blood are evaluated through monitors.

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after general anesthesia, I woke in recovery paralyzed and unable to breath, as I was unable to move I couldn't shout out, I remember everything going dark as I imagined I was dying, what happened?

clayton2995

I WAS TOLD BY MY SURGEON THAT BECAUSE I AM 80 YEARS OLD,I CAN NOT WITHSTAND "GENERAL ANESTHESIA". HE STATED THAT I MAY NOT WAKE UP. I AM UNDERNOURISHED BECAUSE OF A CELIAC DISEASE. I MY ABSORPTION IN BAD, THUS THE REASONS OF BEING UNDERNOURISHED. PLEASE ADVISE, THANK YOU, CS

I have fibromyalgia and I had to have a unterine ablation, which they used a general anesthesia. Within 24hrs of surgery, I couldnt move my body. I was in severe pain. this lasted for about 2 days, then slowly went away. Now I have to have a hysterectomy and Im scared this will happen again. Was it an allergic reaction?

IAM EIGHTY YEARS OLD SKINY MAN WITH AN ENLARGED INGUINAL HERNIA. WHAT KIND OF ANESTHESIA SHOULD BE DONE DURING SURGERY?.I AM TOLD THAT IT COULD BE FATAL IF I AM OPERATED UNDER GENERAL ANESTHESIA. ALSO I HAVE SCOLIOSIS OF THE SPINE AND SUFFER WITH CELIAC DISEASE. THANK YOU VERY VERY MUCH, CLAYTON

CindyG

My Mother underwent breast surgery in mid November 2010. At that time she was in very good health and taking no prescription drugs of any kind. She took only vitamins and aspirin 81. Keep in mind, she is 80 years old, exercised almost daily, ate very healthy and had the heart of a 50 year old. Initially after the surgery she was fatigued, which is to be expected. But over the weeks her health deteriorated and just recently she began showing signs of dementia. I understand dementia is a risk of anesthesia in the elderly, but isn't it unusual for it to occur as late as 3 months after the surgery? My question is this: Why would this condition develop so late and how long does it generally take for the anesthesia to eliminate from her system?

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